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Elephant in town of Pai, which is being humanely treated and cared for (albeit, it was rescued from one of the abusive operations in Thailand).

Elephant Camp in town of Pai, where the elephants are being humanely treated and cared for (albeit, most of them were rescued from other abusive operations in Thailand).

Apparently, I did take some photographs of Chiang Mai that I uploaded to my tablet before losing my camera in my trekking accident. Those coupled with photographs I have been taking of my visit in Pai with my tablet camera comprise this post and my next post (which depending on my WIFI connection, will be out tomorrow).

If you read my last post (see below), then you know that my 3 day, 2 night mountain trek was a bit harrowing emotionally and exhausting physically.

https://aroundtheworldwithblade.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/chaing-mai-thailand-northern-mountain-trek-its-not-what-you-think-or-what-the-brochure-describes/

This gentle giant was munching on bamboo when I interrupted dinner.

This gentle giant was munching on bamboo when I interrupted dinner.

The Pai hot springs provided the perfect remedy to that experience. After doing my morning exercise regimen – 5 sets each of 40 push ups and 125 crunches, I had an delicious breakfast at the Pai hotel resort I was staying at. Afterwards, I soaked in the hot springs for a couple of hours. Quite convenient, since the hot springs is at the hotel. I followed that with an oil massage, which is also located at the hotel. After the masseuse finished my massage, I hit the hot springs again for another hour.

Ahh! Serene and peaceful again!  🙂

Buddhist Nam Hoo Temple.

Buddhist Nam Hoo Temple. This is a memorial shrine to Her Royal Highness Supankalaya, the older sister of King Narusuan The Great. Notice I am wearing only socks. Wearing shoes inside any part of this memorial and the temple is forbidden (and demonstrates a lack of respect). Likewise, you can’t wear shorts inside these religious temples or memorials.

The sacred Chiang Saen-style Buddha image, called "Un Mueang." The head of the image is hollow and contains holy water.

The sacred Chiang Saen-style Buddha image, called “Un Mueang.” The head of the image is hollow and contains holy water.

Another lesson learned from my Chiang Mai mountain trek “group excursion” was to research a little bit more (asking people, especially locals where to go and what to do) before plunging in on any tour, especially the ones that seem a bit too good to be true. Consequently, I was able to participate in an excellent tour yesterday, where I was able to visit the Pha Suea waterfall, another hot springs (separate from my hotel), Pai Canyon, Pai Memorial Bridge, a Chinese village, elephant preserve, Nam Hoo Temple, Coffee In Love – a restaurant with spectacular views of the Pai valley; and the Mae Yen Temple.

Buddhist monk who allowed me to take a picture with him. Interesting fact - I can ask him questions and hand him items; however, a female is not allowed to do so, i.e., she must use someone else to do to accomplish either.

Buddhist monk who allowed me to take a picture with him. Interesting fact – I can ask him questions and hand him items; however, a female is not allowed to do so, i.e., she must use someone else to accomplish either. Of course, I can’t speak Thai, so that aspect is a moot point. Grin.

The "Gong Show" at Nam Hoo Temple.

The “Gong Show” at Nam Hoo Temple.

Mae Yen Temple.

Mae Yen Temple.

Completely insane, but I actually walked across this rock formation at Pai Canyon. My mountain trek experience has given me courage to do things I wouldn't otherwise try (hehehe).

Completely insane, but I actually walked across this rock formation at Pai Canyon. My mountain trek experience has given me courage to do things I wouldn’t otherwise try (hehehe).

Even more insane - taking a picture of the canyon "drop."

Even more insane – taking a picture of the canyon “drop.”

Another view of this Pai Canyon "bridge."

Another view of this Pai Canyon “bridge.”

On the Pai Memorial bridge constructed in 1912.

On the Pai Memorial bridge constructed in 1912.

The local Pai farmers burn underbrush in the mountain forests during the dry season, thus the polluted haze that surrounds the area for days. Ironically, this was worse than Bangkok in my opinion. The only good thing about this, is that the sun obviously isn't as intense and consequently, the temperature is a bit less intense.

The local Pai farmers burn underbrush in the mountain forests during the dry season, thus the polluted haze that surrounds the area for days. Ironically, this was worse than Bangkok in my opinion. The only good thing about this, is that the sun obviously isn’t as intense.

Johnny Depp look-a-like. This guy was Thai, but it was amazing how much he looked like the actor.

Johnny Depp look-a-like. This guy was Thai, but it was amazing how much he looked like the actor.

Part of the hot springs facility at my resort hotel.

Part of the hot springs facility at my resort hotel.

The breakfast was delicious each morning at my hotel. The restaurant has views of the Pai river (the mouth of which is the Salween river). Frequently, you see elephants walking by. Each day, I had fruit, an omelet, hot coffee, various types of fruit juice and fresh bread.

The breakfast was delicious each morning at the Pai Hot Springs hotel. The restaurant has views of the Pai river (the mouth of which is the Salween river). Frequently, you see elephants walking by. Each day, I had 5-6 different types of fruit, an omelet, bacon, hot coffee, various types of fruit juice and fresh bread. Plenty of fuel to last until dinner. I never ate lunch while I was here.

The beautiful park like grounds at the hotel.

The beautiful park like grounds at the hotel.

Entrance into Chinese village I visited. Essentially, these are persecuted Chinese who moved here quite a long time ago after Mao's revolution in the early part of the last century. Sort of touristy, but the villagers have maintained Chinese traditions and have many restaurants and gift shops at this park like village.

Entrance into Santichon Chinese village I visited. Essentially, the story goes that these are persecuted Chinese who moved here quite a long time ago after Mao’s revolution in the early part of the last century. Sort of touristy, but the villagers have maintained Chinese traditions and customs. They have many restaurants and gift shops at this park like village.

Chinese village in Pai.

Santichon Chinese village in Pai.

Chinese village.

Santichon Chinese village.

Chinese village entry way.

Chinese village entry way.

Mor Pang Water Falls.

Mor Pang Waterfalls.

Curious calf that nuzzled up to me. Mom is nearby grazing.

Curious calf that nuzzled up to me. Mom is nearby grazing.

These Thai children stopped by . . . All of this near the Mor Pang waterfalls.

These Thai children stopped by to pet the calf too . . . All of this was near the Mor Pang waterfalls.

As I indicated earlier, I am breaking this down into two posts. These photographs are mostly of Pai and the surrounding area. My next post will comprise some more pictures of Pai, along with those I took while in Chiang Mai. As always – you can zoom in on these pictures by clicking on them, without losing much in the way of resolution. However, now that I am taking pictures with my tablet – where I look like such a goofball holding my “book like” tablet to my head – the clarity and resolution may not be as good as my Canon. Please let me know what you think, since I am viewing the pictures from my 7 inch tablet. Take care . . . Steve 🙂

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