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Yesterday, I visited the Benaki Museum and the Monument (tomb) of the Unknown Soldier at Parliament. I was on “low” energy yesterday, so both of these sites were great places to visit, insofar as being out of the sun (the Museum) and not taking too long to visit (tomb). I also found a noon AA meeting and met quite a few people, some of whom made suggestions on other places in Greece to visit. I enjoyed that meeting so much, I returned for the evening meeting and was invited to join other members for coffee, but passed because I hadn’t ate dinner and needed to “fuel up” before I passed out. Ha.

Another person I met yesterday, invited me to attend a musical and dance revue/cabaret with her this evening and then dinner afterwards. The Greeks are similar to the Spaniards, in that they don’t eat dinner until late in the evening. Also, I wont mention my new friend’s name (yet) because I am not certain she wants her anonymity exposed on a blog. In any event, I am looking forward to seeing the cabaret performance this evening, especially since it is an all-women performance, starring 9 women. This is coupled with the subject being about the current Greek economic crisis. I understand that they will sing, dance, do comedy, perform drama, and read poems. It should be quite interesting.

I was surprised at the excellence of the Benaki Museum. Apparently, it is the oldest museum in Greece operating as a Foundation under Private Law. The collection is outstanding, especially the ancient Greek artifacts. In my opinion, I thought this collection from that time period was in much better shape than similar pieces I saw at the Acropolis Museum (which was excellent as well, but not in the condition that these pieces were in). The Benaki Museum also had an outstanding collection of Asian art and from more recent Greek history – the Ottoman empire and the Greek fight for independence from the Ottoman reign in the 1820s; and again, the period after World War I. The oil painting above, The Man In The Red Fez I have seen before and was painted by Nicholaus Gyzis and is representative of the 1800s.  The second painting below is of the museum benefactor, Mr. Emmanuel Benakis. The collection is housed in his mansion (beautiful building).

The photographs, sans captions, are from my visit to the museum and the Monument to the Unknown Soldier:

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